Weight-loss pill hailed as 'holy grail' in fight against obesity


#1

Some bloody ‘holy grail.’ For £155-£220 a month and you only lose 4kg over 40 months. :joy::joy::joy:


#2

Interesting. This really annoys me:

Prof Jason Halford, an obesity expert at the University of Liverpool, told the Daily Telegraph newspaper that the drug’s availability in the UK would depend on whether it is approved by National Health Service regulators.

“We don’t have any appetite suppressants available on the NHS. We have a massive great gap between lifestyle modification and surgery,” he said.

“At the moment you either get support and advice, or you get to surgery - there is nothing in between. This could be widely prescribed if it is approved by Nice (the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence) in the UK.”

It annoys me not just because MVF is clearly the bit in the middle (lifestyle interventions and information) but because there is such shortsightedness in the medical response. Even Tam Fry from the National Obesity Forum says that it’s a Holy Grail but “has to be done in association with lifestyle changes”. But unless there is support to inform and support those lifestyle changes then you can throw pills and surgery at everyone but they’ll still find a way to unpick the progress.


#3

They can definately unpick it. I know someone who gained weight after having gastric band surgery. They just liquidised ice cream and ate that.


#4

I came here to say exactly the same thing after I put it on Facebook.

Be cheaper to pay for MvF, or the other slimming clubs in the NHS.


#5

Hi guys , it’s B.S - giving false hope and costs a fortune as well , eat less - move more !!!


#6

Its an appetite supressant (there’s hundreds of them)

Skipping breakfast is an appetite supressant,
increasing protein intake is an appetite supressant,
increasing veg is an appetite supressant,
limiting calorie dense foods is an appetite suppressant,
exercise is an appetite suppressant,
caffein is an appetite supressant,
changing our eating habits is an appetite supressant
(I could litterally go on all day)

What happens when they run out or go out of production?

Have you developed new habits to sustain any weight loss from having your appetite externally supressed, or we’re they a crutch you relied on which means when its gone you go straight back to how things were before?

it’ll be somerhing else again next year, a magical quick fix pill claiming to navigate the laws of the universe (energy expenditure).

I’ve come to find over the years that nothing about people changes if people dont change

Its why broke people who win the lotto usually lose it all soon after, because they never became wealthy, they we’re just broke people with extra money who lost it all through their broke habits

aposed to broke people who develop the ability to become wealthy are likely to stay wealthy, because they became wealthy people with wealthy habits

Or obese people on a sever crash diet, they typically gain it all back and more because they’re still the same people with the exact same habits

If we wanna change ourselves, we have to CHANGE ourselves

Keep in mind NOBODY in the nutritional science world is advertising or advising people to go down the magic pill route (well at least nobody legit with actual morals & integrity), its the media industry (not the nutritional science industry) who are pushing this in front of the publics faces

Just like diet, exercise, basic nutrition etc

As we all know, the main stream media publications dont tell you about the ‘calorie deficit’ or the legit science, they push the latest headline that will shock, awe and sell

Anyone else remember how confusing things we’re from the media before you discovered the actual simple science?

This is a good example of media sales vs science

How 'bout we stop getting our 'nutritional & exercise SCIENCE from the daily freaking mail & get it from legit nutrition & training science professionals (there’s more than enough publications that you can read or subscribe to) :see_no_evil:


#7

Turns out that Belviq’s maker, Eisai Inc., sponsored the study & many of the writers work for the company.

No such independent studies exist then…

There is no diet or pill than can do what healthy eating does.